The ethical debate on sweatshop labor

Initiatives

Corporate Responsibility is when businesses promote the public interest by encouraging community growth and development, and voluntarily eliminating practices that harm the public.

In support of his contention, Pro notes three specific factors: While this little scenario seems nice, this is not the reality of what occurs. This emergence has given rise to an issue known as Sweatshop Labor.

Sweatshops are ethical

Lower demand means lower prices. The Sweatshops, Labor Rights, and Labor Standards Interest Group will focus on the ethics of work, employment, and employment relations, both in the U.

For instance, by paying workers so little, there is a demand for their labor which incrases company investment in their labor.

In that way, we can see how it would benefit westerners, for instance, because it would give companies less of an incentive to outsource jobs. Today, most people work as employees for employers that range from small business, to non-profit organizations, to government bodies, to multinational corporations.

Now, the source mentions a possiblity of the Chinese government forcing people to work in sweatshops. The treatment received by workers at sweatshop factories challenges the fundamental human rights proposed in the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, which States that everyone has a right to freedom, and shall not be held in servitude or be an object to any offensive forms of treatment.

Sweatshops, like the ones used by Nikkei, are believed to create an environment for the workers that can become potentially dangerous in regards to their health and safety.

The average person in the developed world frowns upon the harsh working conditions associated with sweatshops.

Both definitions agree that the working conditions within sweatshops should be improved; however, activists and other critics can often overlook the benefits of having a factory in these developing countries.

Capitalism fails in this regard as the idea is that demand for labor will increase, though this actually is not true. In the production of shoes, clothing and other commodity goods, business conducted internationally is now more the norm rather than an exception.

Do workers have certain rights that all employers are obliged to recognize or should this relationship be governed by the most exploitive kind of capitalism in which workers are viewed as a variable in the production equation whose costs must be continually lowered?

If you would not consent to being exploited, then you must judge that it would be morally wrong for you to exploit people in that way [3].

Report this Argument Con So far in this debate, Pro has cited one contention only: Unfortunately, the profit motive often motivates employers to disregard these standards and violate the human rights of their employees.

In reality, once the workers can demand higher wages or better conditions, companies simply move to another country; they find people who are even more desparate to employ.

In order to do so, these multinational reparations place their factories in underdeveloped or developing countries like India and China where there are few legal protections for employees. Group Plans The Interest Group would endeavor to bring together faculty and students who share an interest in this area but who come from different disciplines.An Ethical Debate for Sweatshop Labor Business ethics seeks to address issues that arise while doing business internationally.

Not all states enforce ethical standards for business. Consequently, the global community regards the conditions Of workers in certain states, particularly in the developing world, to be in direct violation of human. And it assesses the relevance of recent literature on coercion and exploitation as it applies to sweatshop labor.

It concludes with a list of challenges that critics of sweatshops must meet to productively advance the debate. The Sweatshops, Labor Rights, and Labor Standards Interest Group will focus on the ethics of work, employment, and employment relations, both in the U.S.

and around the world. This broad subject would include issues such as sweatshops, labor standards, right to free association, forced labor, workplace safety and health, and the provision of.

This is an ethical debate. Pro writes, "Life is not fair, but it doesn't help to prevent them from taking the best options that they can get." I never once said not letting them work in sweatshops was the ethical solution (nor did I mention any solution possibility), so this is a blatant strawman of my arguments.

An Ethical Debate for Sweatshop Labor Business ethics seeks to address issues that arise while doing business internationally. Not all. Conclusion To conclude this debate, the problem of sweatshops receives conflicting arguments from both critics and defenders of this type of labour practice.

Throughout this case study the duality of the problem has been adequately demonstrated. Two important conclusions have been reached.

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The ethical debate on sweatshop labor
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